Sunday, April 9, 2017

Climate Change Panel

Yesterday afternoon, we hosted an excellent panel on climate change. The room was full as 70 people turned out for the discussion. Drs. White, Musselman and Friedrich reviewed the fundamental basics of climate science. The presenters shared recent climate research data. Climate change models were presented showing what we can expect in the coming decades. It is very clear we are on a troubling trend. While climate variability has always existed, the increase in man made green house gases over the last hundred years is contributing to recent warming.

I would encourage everyone to learn as much as you can about climate change. Avoid the politics and zero in on the science. Thanks to our presenters for a great presentation and thanks to the audience for all the great questions.

13 comments:

Suzanne Greene said...

Excellkent

Suzanne Greene said...

Excellent panel and discussion!

Paul said...

Hope you prayed for snow at the end!

Anonymous said...

I agree focus on the science, but unfortunately there is so much politics masquerading as science and doctored or cherry-picked data it is hard to discern what is truth anymore.

Regardless of greenhouse gases, the climate is currently much colder than it has been in ages past (pre-human) and will continue to change dramatically (including warming) regardless.

The good science will help us prepare for the inevitable changes. In the meantime, use common sense, be respectful of our resources and each other, and keep skiing!

Steve M. said...

Thank you Al for a timely discussion.....A Basin's leadership in environmental stewardship and providing education for A Basin's customers helps assure that science is at the center of these critical global problems.

Anonymous said...

Where was Steve Goddard? A voice of reason.

Anonymous said...

I think you are on the wrong track here Al and wish you'd allow my previous post pointing out that there is plenty of "fake science" on climate change that's hard to distinguish. Humans are not the primary driver of climate change; it will happen with or without us and what we need to do is be flexible and not overreact in a few expensive ways that won't solve anything but would cost a fortune and may well do more harm than good. E.g. mercury-laced CF bulbs that also take a lot more energy and resources to produce than traditional "illegal" bulbs did.

We need to work together using common sense and not promote extremism or trite feel-good political solutions that could cripple our country and do nothing to help.

Another example: How is it helpful to have low-usage toilets that need to be double or triple flushed? What about dishwashers that take 3+ hours to do what older ones did in 20 minutes, and while using a little less water, use more energy and defeat the purpose when the owner has to hand-wash a bunch of stuff because it's taking too long?

I know you say ignore the politics, but the idiocy must stop! Promoting human carbon emissions as the big problem is myopic and ultimately irresponsible.

Anonymous said...

I agree it is garbage. The climate is not controllable nor can man affect "climate" which is far different than the weather forecast. This is feel goodish so people can tell themselves they are being responsible to the earth. In the 70s a global cooling was predicted. The "scientists" are always predicting something and getting grants (read free money) to predict something else. It is what they do. Was there talk of the way the skies are being loaded with chemicals spread by aircraft and THAT does affect weather, not climate! One volcanic eruption spurs more particulate into the atmosphere than any one nation can. But what happens then? The atmosphere is self cleaning and it eventually dissipates whatever is in the air. This is just an old story of man thinking he is far more in charge of the world than he really is. There have been periods of huge carbon heating and they were way before human occupation of the earth. Which would you prefer anyway, more warmth or more cold. It is dang hard to grow food in the cold!!

Anonymous said...

CF bulbs are so 2010

Anonymous said...

Too much censorship on comments. Is this like a current university setting here?

Liz M said...

It seems to me that these anonymous posters could have benefited by attending Saturday's discussion and engaging face-to-face with three accomplished scientists. Many of the claims in the comments above were discussed and refuted.

Thanks to A Basin for hosting this panel and for being an industry leader in sustainability. Al, ignore these naysayers, you're on the right track.

anon said...

Remember most people who deny climate change have never, and will never study any of the science involved.

Ryan said...

Anon,

I was one of them until the numbers opened my eyes. Look with an unbiased mind and the truth of the matter is inescapable. The climate is warming, and at an accelerating rate. Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are increasing. The correlation between the two, temperature and carbon dioxide levels, especially when plotted on a graph, is uncanny. Throw in sea level rise from melting ice caps, ocean acidification from the ocean absorbing more carbon dioxide from a more carbon rich atmosphere, intensifying storms as the decades roll on by, the effects on aquatic life in the oceans (coral reefs, and their dying by way of increasing ocean temperatures and increasing ocean acidification), and changing precipitation patterns across the globe, and you have some major things happening to the Earth's climate.

There is nothing political about these well established scientific facts. The numbers speak for themselves, and the raw data can be found by a simple Internet search.

Minds much smarter and more educated than mine have drawn extrapolations from the data, and the consensus among most scientific minds is that this "climate change" is anthropogenic, or man made, made by our burning of fossil fuels, pouring tons upon tons of heat trapping gases (gases that trap the infrared heat emitted by the Earth) into the atmosphere.

I applaud Alan and the staff of Arapahoe Basin for having the courage and will to attempt to educate the public about this important issue. I for one, am grateful for their efforts and the efforts of the scientists involved in this presentation.